Based on herbarium collections Ficus uniglanduosa used to be considered  one of Borneo’s most common figs. However the fact that F. uniglandulosa is a straggling  epiphytic  fig which prefers tall trees along rivers means that it is now relatively uncommon in  secondary forest and cultivated areas.

All photos by Shuai LIAO taken at  Sg Mokodou, Kg Nalumad, Ranau,  Sabah. Collection #  20190356.08 Ficus uniglandulosa Sg. Mokodou●20190356★ Shuai LIAO-LSL_0105.JPG

F. uniglandulosa is in Section Sycidium in which all trees are either male or female (dioecious). The fact that these figs are white, are rotting on the tree uneaten and have open ostioles indicates that this is a male tree where the fig wasps have already left. With a female tree the figs would be ripening orange to red, they would be scarce having been eaten by birds and the ostiole would be closed

09 Ficus uniglandulosa Sg. Mokodou●20190356★ Shuai LIAO-LSL_0105.JPG

10 Ficus uniglandulosa Sg. Mokodou●20190356★ Shuai LIAO-LSL_0105.JPG
The name F. uniglandulosa refers to the fact that there is a single gland at the base of the leaf on the underside, not 2 glands as is often the case with Section Sycidium figs. The photo above clearly shows the single gland  (black dot)  on the two leaves on the RHS of the photo.
05 Ficus uniglandulosa Sg. Mokodou●20190356★ Shuai LIAO-LSL_0105.JPG
These figs are clearly rotting and show no evidence of seeds which would indicate a female fig. Also female figs would ripen pink to red so these must be male figs after the fig wasps have left. Male figs are never eaten by birds  or bats and normally fall to the ground uneaten.

06 Ficus uniglandulosa Sg. Mokodou●20190356★ Shuai LIAO-LSL_0105.JPG

Malaysia, Sabah, Ranau, Kg. Nalumad, Sg. Mokodou●20190356★Photographed By Shuai LIAO-LSL_8894.JPG07 Ficus uniglandulosa Sg. Mokodou●20190356★ Shuai LIAO-LSL_0105.JPG01 Ficus uniglandulosa Sg. Mokodou●20190355★ Shuai LIAO-LSL_8884.JPG